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CEO's Blog

Andy Cook pic

 

8 June 2018

Tuesday evening was a cause for great excitement in the camp. Not only did we pile into my old VW and head up to London (hence why everyone arrived coated in dog hair as my car hasn’t met a hoover for a while), but we broke new ground for Helen Arkell in the process.

5th June 2018 will be remembered as the date when Helen Arkell and Bell House first joined forces to help support people with dyslexia in Dulwich and the surrounding areas. Back in the 1970’s Helen Arkell had a London base as well as Dyslexia Support Buses from which specialist help and advice were provided. So Tuesday evening was the first step in Helen Arkell moving back into South London.

The Bell House venue is lovely but the guys who run it are even lovelier still. Angus and Fabienne, aided and abetted by Chloe, have a vision of restoring the house to its former glory whilst also offering it up as an asset for the local community. They also have a very personal interest in dyslexia, hence why they are so keen that Helen Arkell sets up its new London Dyslexia Hub at Bell House.

The evening took the format of a Panel Discussion, with invited guests (a full house) being given the opportunity to ask a variety of questions regarding dyslexia support. The Panel comprised Angus from Bell House, and Katherine and Yvonne as the experts from Helen Arkell, as Head of Assessments and Head of Education respectively. Chloe acted as the official Chair. I was also on the Panel, but mainly so that people could see if I would fall off the high stool, rather than because of any ability to contribute to in depth discussions on dyslexia.

It was a highly engaging session and we met some hugely enthusiastic people. We all agreed that our new Hub will be busy and much-used, so we will now firm up plans for progressing with the next step.

Thank you to Bell House, and watch this space!!

Andy


11 May 2018

A quick update today, after returning from our annual Golf Day at Liphook, which was again organised by our staunch volunteers Ewan and Sue Stradling, and this year supported by Silver Sponsors Stevens & Bolton LLP and Bronze Sponsors Herbert Parnell.

Most of all though, it was supported by the 52 players who enjoyed this superb course and battled it out for the Leightons Helen Arkell Challenge Trophy.

The sun shone and everyone was well fed and watered from start to finish. We had such a great time that we have already set the date in the diary for next year, so Friday May 10th 2019 it is!

We were honoured to be joined by our founder Helen’s family, who participated fully and we were all touched when Helen herself joined us by ‘video link’ (or by mobile phone actually), to wish us well, and her son David was able to relay back our best wishes to her in return. At 97, Helen is no longer able to attend in person, but she is still the most important player in our team, as this charity wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for her pioneering work setting us up back in 1971.

Gary Hay, our chair of trustees, then presented all the various prizes. Full report to follow, but a quick count up shows that, between us, we raised over £8,000 and still counting… a wonderful day for the whole Helen Arkell Dyslexia Charity.

Thank you to Ewan and Sue for all your hard work and thank you to everyone for taking part - we look forward to doing it all again on May 10th 2019!

Andy

PS Back at the ranch, we were delighted to welcome Fintan O’Regan back to lead his celebrated course: ‘The Curious Case of ADHD’. Thank you Fintan!


27 April 2018

It all started last Sunday in the blazing temperatures and carnival atmosphere of the London Marathon. The day was tinged with anxiety, as it was clear that many runners were struggling, and ultimately we heard the tragic news of Matt Campbell. So it was a huge relief to see our brave gang of three making it safely home and we are so grateful for all their efforts, raising £5,907.50 so far and still rising!

Three days later we were back in London, but in our glad rags this time, because we were on our best behaviour at the House of Commons. This event was made possible by the fact that Jeremy Hunt, our local MP, kindly booked us a slot in one of the lovely rooms within the House, which can hold 50 guests. So it was that 50 guests came to join us for tea and cakes and we were able to congratulate our runners in person.  

Indeed we asked one of our runners to give the main speech.   We were all very moved by Hannah’s story about her experience of dyslexia and overcoming her fear to tell everyone that she was dyslexic when she set up her fundraising page for the London Marathon. As Hannah said, “Whilst people with dyslexia struggle in school, they excel in life”, and she is demonstrating that beautifully.

No sooner did we return to base, back in rural Frensham, than we were getting busy for our next event this weekend. Over a hundred teachers and teaching assistants are coming for our Saturday Morning lecture, where Sharon Goldie will be taking the stage. These events not only provide people with ongoing continuous professional development in the field of dyslexia and specific learning difficulties, but they are also a big reunion because many of the delegates have been trained by us here. It will be great!

Then on Sunday we have been invited to be part of a charity event at our local church, St Mary’s in Frensham, so we will be back on our best behaviour again and enjoying the opportunity to talk to more people about the great work we do here.

Thank you for all your interest and support

Onwards and upwards!

Andy


23 April 2018

Our runners did us proud at the London Marathon on Sunday and I’m sure you will be relieved to hear that they all completed the course safe and sound.

They will definitely be sore for a few days but have the satisfaction of knowing that they completed one of the biggest challenges there is, on one of the most challenging days in the history of the marathon, in record high temperatures.

Sarah, Hannah and Jude – we salute you and we thank you for everything you have done to further the cause of dyslexia in general and the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Charity in particular.

And as an added bonus, we know that at least one of our runners featured on the TV coverage, as Hannah’s friends spotted her and managed to take a photo of her on the TV screen!

A round of applause for all our runners! Take a bow, Sarah, Jude and Hannah!!

 


20 April 2018

What a week! Not only did we launch our Dyslexia Support Group on Wednesday evening but the sun even shone properly for more than a few minutes at a time, which was quite a novelty. Now it will be unbearably hot for our marathon runners. You can’t win, can you?!

We had a great time with our much-awaited Support Group coming to fruition, thanks to some sponsorship from our friends at Farnham Town Council. There was great energy in the room as we brainstormed all the various things we would like the support group to cover over the coming months, including inviting external speakers to come and share their personal experiences of dyslexia as well as providing useful tips on various subjects relating to dyslexia in today’s world. If you would like to be involved in future sessions just let us know and you will be very welcome. Before long we will advertise on our website which topics will be covered on which evenings.

We say a big Thank You to volunteer Laura, who coordinated the whole thing, working around her almost full-time job at Credit Suisse, and also turned up with several bottles of wine to help the evening go with a swing. Thank you Laura!

From one great volunteer we move on to four others – our brilliant London Marathon runners, who have spent so much of their time training in recent weeks but also fundraising too! We are gutted for Nina, who went through all the training but has had to pull out at the last minute through injury. It just wouldn’t have been sensible or viable to put her body through 26.2 miles without causing lasting damage. Such a shame for her when she undertook so many months of training, pounding the streets through the dark winter months. Maybe next year?

So it is Hannah, Jude and Sarah who will be flying the Helen Arkell flag for us on Sunday. Spare a thought for them, because they will need all your positive vibes to keep them going for four, five or possibly six hours, proudly displaying their posh Helen Arkell Dyslexia Charity vests.  

Please give them a big cheer from the comfort of your garden, as you sit enjoying the sunshine. And please do your bit by adding to their brilliant fundraising efforts.They thoroughly deserve your support. Here are their fundraising pages:

Please sponsor Sarah

Please sponsor Jude

Please sponsor Hannah

Go runners go! Do it for dyslexia! And a massive thank you from all of us for putting yourselves through this challenge for our little charity. See you on Sunday!

Andy


29 March 2018

Our centre has been buzzing this week with a constant flow of people coming through our doors for specialist consultations, assessments and 1 to 1 coaching. We were even joined by educational psychologist Gavin who flew into the UK for a few days to help us meet the demand for our services, before then heading back out to his home overseas.    

Many people travel to us at our Centre in Frensham, but we are also looking at ways we can help people who live further away. On that note, I was delighted to visit the guys at Bell House this week, to see if we could work with them to support more people from their base in South East London. It’s good when charities work together.

Yesterday’s excitement was in our local village, where we were invited to be the benefitting charity at the Village Lunch in the British Legion Hall. We had a great time and were delighted to be there. We made many friends and sold lots of bits and bobs (all donated to us) for 50p each. This added up to an amazing £136.81 by the time everything was counted up. That’s a lot of 50p’s!

Then today’s big news was that one of our London Marathon runners, Hannah, was successful in gaining sponsorship of £250 from a company called Mazars. Hannah is dyslexic herself, so feels the cause very strongly.

We sent out our monthly e-newsletter this week, so you’ll find lots of other news there. If you don’t receive this currently, and you’d like to know what’s going on (such as our brand new Dyslexia Support Group), just get in touch.

Likewise, if you know of any company, or club who you think might like to raise a few 50p’s for us, to help us provide our services to more people with dyslexia, just let us know.

Happy Easter!

Andy


23 March 2018

What a wonderful evening we had a few days ago, in the beautiful surroundings of Farnham Castle, which provided the fitting back drop for the glitz and glamour that is the annual Graduation Ceremony for all recent Helen Arkell graduates from our Level 5 and Level 7 courses in the specialist teaching of learners with dyslexia and specific learning difficulties.

Our graduates took centre stage, and rightly so, but we also took the opportunity to say a big thank you to all their hard working tutors too, who basked in the glory of their brilliant pupils.

The occasion was made all the more special by the fact that everyone was dressed in their glad rags to mark the occasion (it took a while for everyone to recognise each other!). A huge amount of hard work and dedication goes into these course from all parties, and this was the opportunity to relax and recognise the great achievement.

Our graduates come from far and wide, and are now furthering the cause of specialist teaching for people with dyslexia out in their local schools and communities. This is such an important part of this charity’s mission, because it is through these committed and caring teachers that so many more people with dyslexia will receive special personalised teaching from someone who understands their difficulties. They will feel encouraged and supported by these teachers who have such a special interest in adapting their approach to the needs of the individual learner. People think and learn in different ways, and our graduates enjoy helping them to find the way that works best.

Jonathan Hetherington, headmaster of More House School, gave an inspirational keynote speech and was clearly delighted to be part of our Big Day. Links between Helen Arkell and More House School are strong. We really appreciated that Jonathan took time out from his busy schedule to join in the fun.    

This was a big team effort, but taking the lead with the organisation for this event were Julie, Sam and Yvonne, who masterminded the whole thing and organised the rest of us within the Helen Arkell team.

Special mention of our volunteer photographer Rob, who made sure that everyone could get a fitting memento from their big day.

On a different note, spare a thought for our four marathon runners who are getting ever closer to the day of the London Marathon itself. I’m sure the date of 22nd April is scaring the living daylights out of them. They are working so hard to gain sponsorship too.

Also spare a thought for Victoria who was due to run the Reading Half Marathon for Helen Arkell, but snow stopped play.

Thank you for everything you are doing to support us in our work.

We really appreciate it.

Andy

  


9 March 2018

This week has been typically busy, with many people coming through our doors for their consultations and specialist assessments, or to take part in the many courses we offer, giving people greater awareness of dyslexia. The hall has been full every day of the week with one group or another, and as I write this, the last participants are just departing from their Supporting Learners Course.

Away from the Centre there has been lots going on too. Yesterday I was delighted to spend the day with Rosemary and Julia, our Specialist Teachers who are in situ at St George’s School, Ascot. Working at a distance from the Centre, they are still very much part of the team.

As regards the wider team of volunteers and supporters, this week we shine the light on four amazing people who, despite the weather, are trudging round their local streets, gritting their teeth through sheer pain, because they are so determined to do us proud in 6 weeks’ time when they will have to put one foot in front of another for the 26.2 miles of the London Marathon. Not only that, but in their spare time they have to do something equally painful, which is to ask their friends, family and work colleagues for money, which is never easy! So please give a big salute to our intrepid and inspiring runners, Jude, Sarah, Hannah and Nina…..and please help them along their way by sponsoring them for £10, which would make you equally amazing! £10 really does make a big difference, and helps us to provide another 1 to 1 session for someone who needs it. Thank you!!

Nina’s story
I'm running the London Marathon in support of Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre hoping that I can raise some money to help supporting those who can't afford getting help and to raise awareness. It is important to me because I see the battle my 3 dyslexic children fight on a daily basis just getting through the schoolday. Read on…

Hannah’s story
First off, I’m dyslexic and for many years I have been very embarrassed to admit it but now I’m proud of it. Read on…

Sarah’s story
When I was 6 my teacher tapped my bottom because she thought I was not paying attention when I was unable to read to her, at her desk. Read on…

Jude’s story
Helen Arkell is a really important charity providing dyslexia support. Which is particularly close to my heart, as two of my eldest children both suffer from dyslexia to varying degrees. Read on…

 


2 March 2018

‘At last Spring is here’, we all said, and then look what happened!

There is no doubt that this week has been dominated by the snow. Our hearts go out to all those people, up and down the country, whose lives have been turned upside down by Storm Emma or ‘The Beast from the East’. People’s safety is more important than anything else, so it was with reluctance but in the knowledge we were doing the right thing, that we took the decision to close for business on Thursday and Friday.

With over a thousand appointments booked in a year, it’s no surprise that there was a lot of extra work involved, calling round all the people who were booked in for assessments, coaching or specialist tuition here at the Centre or out and about in the regions. All these appointments will be re-booked of course, as soon as we thaw out.

We were lucky, however, to get some extra help…

Just occasionally in life somebody comes along who is particularly special and has a heart of gold. In this particular case it was a special little bear (or not so little actually, compared with most bears). Teddy Edward Arkell Bear, to be precise. Ted has been an absolute invaluable help this week, manning the phones, franking the post, and making a start on the monthly accounts. He has managed to get into the Centre each day despite the snow, mainly due to his furry feet which have good grip in icy conditions. I particularly appreciated his help as I also managed to make it into the Centre (because of a mountain bike rather than furry feet), and Teddy Edward helped me stuff lots of envelopes, as we prepare for our Springtime events. (Ha! Springtime? What Springtime!) When things get back on an even keel, Ted will return to his normal duties, entertaining the children who come through our doors for help with their dyslexia. Or maybe we’ll just promote him to CEO.

Despite the snow closure, we still managed to put out our monthly e-newsletter. This month, our big headline was Thank you Farnham Town Council! This is because the guys at FTC have chipped in with some sponsorship for us to set up a monthly Dyslexia Support Group. The first of these will take place on the evening of Weds 18 April so do get in touch if you’d like to hear more about it. Likewise, if you’d like to be added to the list to receive the monthly e-newsletter, let us know too, then you won’t miss out on news about events, fundraising and generally what’s going on in the world of Helen Arkell.

Earlier in the week, before the snow fell too thickly here, we were delighted to welcome Dan to see us, who is the head at Edgeborough School just down the road. We’d like to see if there are ways we could work together, as well as with other schools in the area. Then our next visitor was Peter, who is a grandson of our charity’s founder and namesake, Helen Arkell herself. It was great to catch up with Peter and hear about the old days as well as sharing all our (many) plans for taking the charity forward into a future where we aim to help lots more people with dyslexia.

I’d better go now. Teddy Edward Arkell Bear is packaging up the post and it sounds like he needs rescuing from some particularly sticky sellotape.

Stay safe in the snow!

Andy


23 February 2018

It’s been another busy week in the life of Helen Arkell. We were delighted to join up with More House School and take part in their Open Day, talking to the 200 prospective parents who came through their doors. Both More House and Helen Arkell are centres of excellence and it’s unusual that we are on each other’s doorstep, making collaboration so easy. A school and a charity can work brilliantly together.

This afternoon’s excitement was to hook up with the guys at Help for Heroes to see if there might be ways we could work together to support people from armed forces backgrounds and their families. Yvonne and I were so impressed by everything at Tedworth House and it was brilliant to catch up with Mark again, one of the prime-movers in the development of H4H. The whole ethos at H4H is fantastic. It’s all about helping the guys in whatever way works best. And at Helen Arkell we will certainly do our bit to help out too, where we can.

Apart from that, it’s been a busy week in all sorts of other ways. Our four marathon runners are training hard and fundraising like mad. Our Charity Golf Day is taking bookings, with six people already having told me they’re signing up just this afternoon. Plus we’re getting ready for our Graduation Ceremony at Farnham Castle which takes place in a few weeks.

Meanwhile our dyslexia specialists have been hard at work, supporting people day in day out. On that note, I’m going to hand you over to Sara, who is going to tell you a bit about her role, to give you an idea of what goes on here. Over to you Sara…

My journey to becoming a dyslexia assessor began when I was a primary school teacher.  I was curious as to why some children seemed to struggle so much with literacy when they were verbally able, achieving in other areas of the curriculum and keen to learn.  My interest led me to the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre and now my weeks are busy with assessing students at the Centre. 

I assess students of all ages, from infant to secondary school and their academic needs vary from support with phonics, writing, spelling, reading, study skills and Access Arrangements for exams.  Despite their different ages, many of the students I see have a number of similarities.  For example, whether they are 5 or 15, they all want to achieve their potential and it is our role as assessors to help them achieve that. 

Whilst students come to us to find out whether they have dyslexia, part of my role is also to give them and their teachers recommendations, based on the findings from the assessment.  After a detailed analysis of their literacy skills and assessment of other aspects of learning, such as memory, I am able to put together a detailed profile of each student and this informs the recommendations that I make. These will then help the student to learn effectively.

Parents also play a role in the assessments.  Not only is it sometimes their ‘gut instinct’ that led them to us for an assessment but they are also often looking for support.  After my conversations with parents during the assessment session, we often finish in the book shop where there are numerous resources and books for them as well as their children.  Parents are also interested in the courses that we offer, such as the HELP course and the Revision course for parents who want to learn more about how they can support their children when exams are looming. And also courses, such as touch-typing for children.  

By the end of an assessment, the student has an understanding of why they are finding some aspects of school more challenging and what we can do to help them, as well as their areas of strength and how they can use these strengths.

Importantly, they also understand that all our brains work differently and that this is OK.

 


16 February 2018

This week I have had the pleasure of spending time with two dozen young people who are coming up to their GCSEs.  We spent a couple of hours on Tuesday and Wednesday looking deeply into how their brains work best and how to keep them happy during learning, reading, revision and exams.

As is often the case, I learnt a great deal from them whilst guiding them through strategies and techniques.  They were positive about sharing ideas that had worked for them in the past, in developing strategies for the future and also about talking through problems they face when learning and trying to remember detailed information across an array of subjects.  New to me was the practical dilemma that some students face - that they are not permitted a watch on their desk in exams and must rely upon a wall clock somewhere in the distance across a crowded exam hall!  If this is the case in your school or for your child, please consider how you may guide them to keep an eye on passing time and be aware of how to use it effectively under the stress of exam conditions.

We explored many ideas for learning and remembering and keeping that brain happy!  At the end of each session we considered the strategies that they found most useful and these fell into 2 main themes.

The first related to how they learn.  They felt that school gives them lots of what to learn, but not much time is spent on how to do it.  Once this very individual concept of metacognition is understood and explored, the student can develop their own resilience for learning best, no matter what the subject matter may be; Spanish vocabulary, history, learning to drive or quantum physics!

The second related to anxiety and how to keep it at bay.  Although it may seem far away right now, the exam season will soon be upon us with all its stresses and worries.  Staying organized, communicating across the home and family about how everyone can help to keep things calm, learning to reward for effort and keeping the ‘exam thing’ in its place will help.  This is true for everyone, however neurodiverse. 

So if you are unsure how to help, take a look elsewhere on our website or give us a call.  We try our best to respond to what you want, be you teacher, parent, student, grandparent or neighbour.  The truth is that we all have to go through tests, exams, training, CPD, and updates at work whether paid or volunteering.  So keeping our brains happy and functioning well is relevant to us all and will help with learning throughout our lives.

Good luck everyone!

Claire

 

2 February 2018

“Excuse me, Gilly, but exactly why were there a group of parents jumping up and down and waving their arms around in the courtyard this morning?”

You may well ask!

The HELP! Parents’ Course is back in action and after a somewhat harrowing first week when parents got to hear everything there is to know about being dyslexic, we’ve put the tissues away and are now on the up exploring ways of learning and taking time to discover all the strengths our dyslexic children have… and there are many.  Kindness seems to be at the top of the list and parents this week shared many examples of their children’s exemplary behaviour, great leadership skills and empathy with others….in today’s world that’s great to hear.

So, why the jumping up and down?  Well, we were exploring different ways of learning.  Ways that would make learning more fun, more hands on and, most importantly, very memorable.  The task set was to learn just three lines of a poem by trying out a different way of memorising to the way we had done it in school.  Pictures were drawn, dances made up, actions rehearsed – WHOLE poems were learnt in just 10 minutes – and remembered! And for one father this was a first!! Thank you to everyone who stepped out of their comfort zone and gave it a go….the volume of noise and the giggling were testament to the fun we were having! 

This multi-sensory approach is something we teach on all our courses and hug ourselves with glee when, after weeks of encouraging our students to ‘just give it a go’ we hear comments like: ‘It works!’ “We had SO much fun learning this week…’, ‘They remembered my teaching – a breakthrough moment!’ 

A lovely story from one parent was when she related that after Week 2 of the Parents’ Course she had sat with her daughter who was attempting to write a story for homework.  The mum sat and scribed for her daughter writing down on a plan all the ideas that, through discussion, were pouring forth.  Once these were down they decided that the story would start with a dramatic chase.  The mother, remembering her poem learning experience and keen to give that multisensory ‘thing’ a try, decided that a fast run around the block would give insight to what it felt like to be chased.  Puffing and panting sometime later the story was being written.  Imagine the father’s amazement, when on returning from work and before he had got in through the door, his I-can’t-write-a-story daughter was thrusting a page of writing at him proudly exclaiming her new found prowess as an author!! Top marks – and thank you for giving it a go!

We hear lots of stories like this and are proud of our parents for giving up six mornings to come and explore the world of dyslexia and learning– mind you, you don't have to have a dyslexic child to come and join us!  If you think your child may be struggling with learning then come and learn about learning with us.  Hope to see you.  The course takes place termly and details are here 

My other Helen Arkell hat is keeping our Facebook and Twitter pages full of interesting, fun, controversial and sometimes thought provoking articles, pictures and news.  I feel very strongly that we need to focus on the positive and move away from the doom and gloom that can surround dyslexia.  There are some amazing projects taking place out there.  Whether it's a new book, a new resource or a writing competition I’ll find it and share it with you.  We are at the forefront of all things dyslexic and like to keep you involved. 

To this end I spend time each day sifting through the millions of posts that hit social media second by second, hour by hour, and pick out the best for you.  You will have to forgive my dallies into the etymology of words – do you know what an Interrobang is? - quotes from Winnie the Pooh, YouTube clips of people dancing on giant piano keys, the latest news on education from Westminster or stories from those who are “Made by Dyslexia”.  I start the day with the ipad and a cup of coffee and may have travelled the world, entered numerous businesses, read articles, checked out many resources, ‘met’ new and interesting people over an hour later.  Hope you enjoy what you see!  It certainly gets you all talking.  So thank you for commenting on the posts and sharing them with your followers!

As our links with you all grow and more and more of you join in the conversation and travel with us on the journey through dyslexia we become a more formidable and knowledgeable family of multi-skilled and talented people.  With so much positivity and enthusiasm flowing we will make a difference and stop the historic and dated belief that failure is the destiny for dyslexics. 

It’s very exciting.

Gilly 

 

26 January 2018

This week started off in London, joining up with colleagues from the field of dyslexia to discuss a combined approach for raising awareness of dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties in government circles. Contrary to what you may have heard, charities do work together whenever possible, because we are stronger when we pull in the same direction. Helen Arkell is pleased to play its part and sit at the same table as other organisations in this field.

On returning to our Frensham Centre, there was big excitement, for two reasons. Firstly, it was Day One of our latest HELP Parents Course, where a new group of parents joined us, all with a keen desire to learn more about dyslexia from our expert trainer Gilly. Most of these people will have had a son or daughter diagnosed with dyslexia and will be looking for hints and tips as to how they can support their child more effectively. The room was full to capacity and there was a really positive buzz about the place.

The second reason for all the excitement was that we received a wonderfully generous donation from a supporter who is keen to ‘do their bit’ to make life better for people with dyslexia. I won’t name them, for obvious reasons, but they know who they are, and they know how immensely grateful we are. The more donations we receive as a charity, the more people we can help.

On that note, our doors are open to provide help and support to children and adults with dyslexia in any way we can. We expect to directly help over a thousand people with dyslexia this year, whether through initial assessments or ongoing coaching and tuition. This week has been particularly busy, which is good because it means we are fulfilling our mission in life.

Meanwhile our professional courses are progressing well. Things are hotting up for the students who are nearly half way through their OCR Level 5 and 7 courses. We are delighted to work with local schools in providing our students with real life teaching practice, working with specially identified pupils. In this way we can ‘give back’ to the local community as well as providing specialist dyslexia training to teachers.

Thank you for visiting our website. You will find there’s lots going on, and all sorts of ways in which we may be able to help you, either by providing an assessment or coaching, or enrolling you onto a course that is appropriate for you.

If you would like to get involved and join the Helen Arkell family, we would love to hear from you.

Thank you for all your support!

Andy

12 January 2018

Hannah is the Direct Marketing Manager at dennis.co.uk, a company whose vision is to be the most dynamic media company in the UK. 

Hannah also happens to be dyslexic.

This is her story, as told to me earlier this week:

For as long as I can remember I have always been trying to hide the fact that I'm dyslexic. I think this is down to being treated as 'different' at school; being segregated when doing my exams and the embarrassment that I've got a weakness. 

This has meant I've adapted and come up with my own way of working to try and keep up with everyone and I'll work for hours on something which should only take a few minutes, to make sure there is no mistake. Whereas some of these are good qualities to have, on the other hand, I've been putting up an unnecessary barrier and get really upset when I talk about being dyslexic.

And this is the main reason I want to run the London Marathon on behalf of this charity. I want to get over the embarrassment and show people that I am proud to be different because I am, and how with the right support you can achieve anything. I've always believed this and want to inspire people to believe in themselves. I've achieved things I never thought would have been possible when I was struggling at school and recently won an industry award for the Subscriptions Team Member of the Year, and I believe this was down to being dyslexic. I'm creative, hardworking, and look and understand the world differently and that's why I won. 

My training is well underway, I was able to do lots of runs over Christmas and have clocked up over 70km in training already.

I’ve never run a marathon before so please help me! This is my fundraising page:

https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/HannahManningSwallow

Please help me and donate to a brilliant cause, to help Helen Arkell help someone else like me.

Thanks 

Hannah

3 January 2018

2017 has been and gone, and Santa has hung up his clogs for another year. Which means that 2018 is here!

The start of a new year always makes you look forward to fresh beginnings, and fresh challenges, especially now that the evenings are already getting a bit lighter. We will be welcoming a new group of parents to start their 6 week course with us in just a couple of weeks’ time. This is already fully booked so we are busy accepting bookings for the next course in April. Likewise, as winter gently moves into Spring we will be welcoming groups of learners through our doors for various other courses: GCSE Study Skills workshops, Supporting Learners with Dyslexia/Specific Learning Difficulties workshop, Saturday Morning Lectures, Touch Typing and more besides.

Already this week we have provided specialist assessments to several children and adults. We expect to help over a thousand people with dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties this year.  

Meanwhile our current group of teachers and teaching assistants who are studying with us for OCR Levels 5 and 7 will be heartened by the success of their predecessors from last year’s courses. They will celebrate their graduation at Farnham Castle in March.

On the fundraising front, we are busy working behind the scenes with various events in the pipeline. For our intrepid London Marathon runners, the date of Sunday April 22nd is fixed in their minds as it means they only have 15 weeks left to complete their training. And the last week of that will be spent with their feet up eating pasta! It would really cheer them up if you would boost their spirits with a donation please! I just have, and it only takes a few seconds: Julian’s page is here, where you can also read his story.

And this is Sarah’s page, who is really worried about getting sponsorship, and she is so desperate to help more people with dyslexia. Thank you for any sponsorship you can give, however small.

If you’d like to join me in London to cheer on our runners on April 22nd, just let me know. 26.2 miles is a very long way to run, so we will cheer loudly!

Spring is also going to bring excitement in the form of our Golf Day on Friday 11th May, on the superb Liphook Golf Course. We are now actively accepting entries so please do register with a friend, or indeed three friends if the four of you would like to play together. Just enter here.

As I sit writing this, Gill has just brought me through an application to our bursary fund. It is from an adult who of course will remain nameless. They are desperately wanting some help and support for their dyslexia, in the hope that our expertise can help them to read with their children and ultimately to get into employment. Above all, like most people who come to us, they are severely lacking in confidence and seeking a new way forward in life. This is why we do this work, because we are all committed to helping people like this.

If you believe that 2018 is the year when you will choose to support Helen Arkell in some way, shape or form, we would absolutely love to hear from you.

Happy New Year!

Andy  

22 December 2017

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! A huge thank you to everyone for all your help this year. As we look forward to 2018, here is a snapshot of 2017 in numbers…

We provided direct support to 1,115 people with dyslexia.

We provided specialist assessments to 953 people, through one of our specialist assessors or educational psychologists.

We provided specialist coaching or tuition to 162 people with dyslexia.

We provided advice, help and teaching to 1,362 parents whose children are or may be on the spectrum for dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties.

We provided expert face to face teaching in dyslexia to 57 teachers and teaching assistants, who became qualified to OCR Level 5 or Level 7 this year.

We held 16 events across the south of England, delivering training directly to 778 teaching staff. We worked with other organisations from the world of dyslexia in delivering this DfE-funded project.

We ran Saturday morning lectures, HELP courses for parents, touch-typing courses, a new ‘Supporting Learners’ course and more besides…

We look forward to 2018 with optimism, as we aim to touch the lives of many more people with dyslexia. As always, our determination is to fulfil the wishes of Helen Arkell herself, who set up this amazing charity in 1971. Helen, now in her 90’s, is our inspiration.

Our big aim in 2018 is to raise more funds so that we can help even more people. In the diary we already have 5 runners participating in the London Marathon on 22nd April , (Sarah needs your help) plus spaces for 60 golfers to take part in our special charity Golf Day on 11th May at Liphook.

If you would like to join our overall team effort, and contribute to the cost of providing help to a child or adult with dyslexia, please donate via the following link:

Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

 

Thank you for all your help and support!

Happy New Year!!

Andy

15 December 2017

This week has been a brilliant mix of Scotland and Surrey, mostly spent in a haze of mulled wine.

Tuesday was about as exciting as it gets. For starters, there was snow on the ground in the run-up to Christmas. And I had a flight up to Edinburgh. And then to cap it all, I was given a nippy little red Fiat 500 as my hire car, to drive to Stirling, which is surrounded by snow-capped hills.

The biggest excitement of all though, was spending the day with the brilliant people at Dyslexia Scotland, and particularly with Cathy, their CEO.  Those guys are absolutely amazing, and are doing some really fantastic work north of the border. Cathy and I talked for hours, comparing notes and hatching plans, and I really appreciated the opportunity of learning from somebody who has been in the business for a few years and who heads up a charity to be proud of. Go and check out their website and you’ll see what I mean.

We talked for so long and got so excited that I nearly missed my plane. But fate was on my side, as the flight was delayed due to the challenging weather conditions, so I ended up back in Surrey somewhere around 11pm.

Then it was straight on to the big excitement of our Christmas Drinks on Wednesday. How absolutely lovely to see everyone who managed to drop in and see us! It was excellent to open our doors to the local community, to extend our hospitality and to have the opportunity to explain what we are doing here, supporting over a thousand people with dyslexia every year.

The team pulled together and did us proud. Everyone mucked in to get the hall ready, and Julie and Gill bought all the provisions, which consisted of mulled wine and nibbles (but mostly mulled wine!). Our centre looked so sweet, all decked out with Christmas decorations and subdued lighting.

Our guests went home happy, and so did we, as many of our neighbours have offered their support in some way, shape or form. Five people have already signed up to become Friends of Helen Arkell; four people are keen to enter our annual Golf Day on 11th May 2018; somebody has signed up to participate in our next HELP Parents course which starts in January. And our raffle proved extremely popular, making the princely sum of £120. (The prize was a hamper full of goodies that have all been donated by our staff – how fantastic is that?!)

The final excitement of the week is that our five entrants in the Virgin London Marathon are stepping up their training now, with 18 weeks until the big day. This is a really difficult time of year to undertake the training, with most runs having to take place at the weekend or otherwise with a head torch around dark streets after work. And it’s cold, trudging around in wet winter. To give them encouragement as they all try to overcome this immense challenge, we will put the spotlight on each of them between now and D Day, to help boost their fundraising efforts, and give them some positive reinforcement.

For starters, here is a link to Julian’s story, and I know he would love it if you could help him get closer to his fundraising target. He has dodgy knees so would particularly appreciate any help you can give!  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/julian-keites

Thank you so much for visiting the pages of our website – we are doing great things here, always with the aim of providing help and support to people with dyslexia. If you know of anybody who you think might benefit from our expert help, please do encourage them to give us a call and we’ll see what we can do.

Best wishes

Andy

7 December 2017

December is here and we are getting ready to open our doors for Christmas Drinks on the evening of Weds 13th December whilst also thinking ahead to next Spring’s charity Golf Day.  

First things first, though. This week began with the final session of our six week course for parents, run by Gilly. It has been wonderful to see this group develop, and their feedback forms have clearly shown how much all the participants appreciated the course. They have learned a lot about dyslexia and also formed friendships with other people ‘in the same boat’. We are hoping to set up a monthly support group soon, so that people can continue to keep in touch, and join the Helen Arkell family for advice and help. Watch this space on that front! 

Our next 6 week course for parents starts on 22nd January, and is already booking up fast, but at time of writing there are still some places available. I highly recommend it.  

Meanwhile over in Hale School, we were delighted to work with staff and also parents of dyslexic pupils, providing expert advice and support. Our Claire is leading on this special project, which is kindly funded by the Downlands Trust. As well as providing advice to teachers and parents we are also giving special support to some pupils.

Back at our Frensham centre, our team of Helen Arkell specialist assessors and educational psychologists have been busy this week with a steady flow of children and adults booking one-to-one sessions. This year we expect to work with over 1,000 people with dyslexia. I had a very interesting meeting with Peter during the week, one of our long-standing educational psychologists on the team, looking at ways we can further grow our ability to support people with dyslexia, with specialist teachers and educational psychologists working together.

This week has also been busy for all those people who are currently undertaking their Level 5 and Level 7 courses with us, gaining specialist qualifications in dyslexia. They are at the stage where they are practising their skills in real classrooms with real pupils, and we are delighted to work with a number of local schools to achieve this. It also means we can ‘do our bit’ to help pupils in our local area, with some additional specialist support.  

I was delighted to meet up with Ewan and Sue in London this week, who are preparing for our annual Golf Day, at Liphook Golf Club. This will take place on Friday May 11th so please do put that date in your diary if you would like an outing on this very special golf course. More about that in due course (no pun intended). Entry forms will be available soon.

While I was in London, I was pleased to also take part in the All Party Parliamentary Group on dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties. This group is an opportunity to engage with decision-makers in parliament, so of course the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Charity is there. 

Next stop for me was Appleford School in Wiltshire. Yvonne and I made the trip to Salisbury, to see if there are ways in which we can work together with this specialist school, supporting more people with dyslexia in that part of the world. 

I had better go now – we need to order some mulled wine and canapes ready for our Christmas Drinks next Wednesday evening (13th December). Book your free place here if you’d like to join us. We would love to see you!

Best wishes

Andy

24 November 2017

It’s been a week of surprises. I went for tea with a real life princess on Tuesday, at Buckingham Palace.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. I haven’t told you about last weekend, when the force of nature that is Dr Susie Nyman inspired all the assembled delegates with her Saturday Morning Lecture on the use of multi-sensory techniques in the classroom. Blimey! If I had had a science teacher like that when I was at school I might not have given it up quite so quickly. As I said to Susie afterwards, the only thing I can remember from many years of trying to learn chemistry is the day back in 1980 when Mr Smith said “now watch the board while I go through it”. Which we all found hilarious.  

Susie’s ideas led nicely into Monday, when in the morning our Gilly was explaining the same sort of innovative techniques in her workshops with the parents in her class, and in the afternoon we were visited by David and Carolyn from Appleford School near Salisbury, where they specialise in teaching pupils with dyslexia. So we really are all talking from the same page (or tablet, or whiteboard, or massive sheet of tablecloth paper if you’re Susie). 

Then came a slightly surreal day, on Tuesday, when I found myself having tea and a custard cream with Her Royal Highness Princess Beatrice at Buckingham Palace. Princess Beatrice is patron of Helen Arkell, and an absolutely brilliant supporter of this charity. As a newbie in the Helen Arkell team it was fantastic to have the opportunity to speak with her, not only about our charity, which is so close to her heart, but also about her own experience of dyslexia, and her ideas. You will be hearing more about these in due course, but I’ve probably said too much already. 

After sitting with a princess in an incredible drawing room in Buckingham Palace one day, reality then kicked in with a bump, when my next meeting was in Pizza Express in Farnham. Luckily, the subject matter was fascinating, as we were discussing GDPR legislation, which comes into force next May. Enough said.

Then it was back into London, for a conference on Literacy and Specific Learning Difficulties, organised by our friends at the BDA, where several lecturers were presenting their latest research into this fascinating area. As the new boy at Helen Arkell, it is essential to learn about what’s going on at the cutting edge of research, and also to meet others in the field. I also felt very proud that Helen Arkell is at the heart of what’s going on in the world of dyslexia, and delighted that our little charity is doing its bit. 

There have been other peaks of excitement this week, as well as meeting princesses. On Wednesday another person signed up to become a Friend of Helen Arkell (which just involves making a regular donation of any amount, to support our work). And one of our students made a donation of £20 earlier in the week which was really sweet of them.

Meanwhile our hall has been full all week, with people learning about dyslexia, whether they be teachers, teaching assistants, parents or others. A steady number of children and adults have visited us throughout the week, working with our specialist teachers and educational psychologists. And our team of expert tutors and coaches have been out and about working with people with dyslexia, helping them to find a way forward that works best for them as an individual, and gets around some of the barriers that you face when you have dyslexia. 

It’s been a varied week, and an absolute privilege to lead the great team effort here at Helen Arkell

I look forward to updating you again next week

Andy

PS If you want to become a Friend of Helen Arkell, just click on the button below and select the monthly donation option, choosing any amount you like. We are just delighted that you’re joining the Helen Arkell family. Thank you so much!

Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

 

17 November 2017

I think there are probably times in every CEO’s life when you have to pretend to be a grown up, and this week has been one of those weeks. 

The thing is, it’s budget-setting time, and having come into the charity a month ago, the pressure’s on to get up to speed with everything quickly in order to set plans and budgets for the year, that are meaningful and well thought through. In actual fact I joined the team with two months of the year having already gone and ten months remaining so the pressure’s even more on. And if that makes no sense to you, as you are already thinking about Christmas and today’s Black Friday deals, you have to bear in mind that our annual cycle follows the academic year, and therefore starts in September and ends next August. 

Just to complicate things, this is also the time of year when we wrap up all our recording of the last academic year and produce our annual report, which details how things went both operationally and financially. It’s the time when we open our doors to the auditors to have a thorough examination of everything, from which the report will be drawn up, and published. It would be wrong of me to pre-empt their work, but it is already apparent that from an operational perspective, we succeeded in helping over 1,000 people with dyslexia last year, as well as training another cohort of teachers to go back into their schools with additional qualifications for the support of their pupils with dyslexia. 

So what does that mean my week actually looked like, you may wonder? Lots of meetings in a pin stripe suit and bowler hat? Well, sort of. Although jeans is fine in my world. (I don’t look good in hats). Monday was all about the finances, in meetings at Cobham motorway services with our treasurer trustee Gary, and Donna our finance bod. (Gary lives in Kent so Cobham is half way from our Surrey centre). Before finalising budgets for this year it’s important to have a good look at how last year went, and draw up plans for the new year accordingly. The main news, however, was that Donna and I had hot chocolate while Gary had a cappuccino and a ham roll. 

Tuesday was then all about our fundraising plans, looking at what’s achievable this year. To help us with this, expert Isobel joined Sam and me, to draw up a plan of action that will hopefully ensure that we can help even more people with dyslexia next year. The more money we can raise, the more people we can help. It’s pretty much as simple as that. 

Once you have a good idea of the amount of money that is likely to be available, the next step is to get the operational team to set plans for making best possible use of it, to fulfil our charitable mission. Our specialist assessors, dyslexia coaches and expert teachers are headed up by our Yvonne and Katherine who have been working in the field of dyslexia and specific learning requirements for many many years, (although they are both still 21, they tell me). So they know all about making operational plans. 

Then yesterday we were ready to put the first draft of the whole plan together, after considering all the things we would need. Our most important resource are our people: all our Helen Arkell specialist assessors, educational psychologists, our coaches and ‘skills-builders’, and professional teachers, because these are the team who will be directly helping, advising and supporting all those people with dyslexia who will come through our doors this year. Coordinating this activity is a big job, ensuring that everything runs smoothly with over 1,000 assessments and coaching sessions taking place. Which is where the back room staff come into their own, quietly and efficiently getting the job done. People like Gill and Claire, Julie and Samantha, Tracy and Donna. And when I say back room staff, I also mean front room staff, as Alice and Sarah man the phones and reception, and act as the first port of call for most of our clients. They also supervise the children when they are playing with the Lego in reception. (They also supervise the CEO when he is playing with the Lego in reception).

It’s a big team effort, and today my senior managers will get together with me, to check that we’ve thought of everything. There will of course be minor tweaks to the plan, but we should be ready to present everything to the board of trustees in ten days’ time. And the various sub committees of the trustees have already been giving valuable and expert input, bringing lots of professional skills from the world of business management, finance and HR, so they have been very much involved. 

In between times this week, I’ve managed to sit in on a few lectures on dyslexia, given by our brilliant teachers. On Monday Gilly was teaching all those parents whose children have been found to have a degree of dyslexia. And I managed to catch some of Tory’s lecture to specialist teachers later in the week. She was talking about the extraordinary resilience that is frequently developed by people who live their lives with dyslexia. Resilience to keep finding ways to make progress, even if barriers are put in the way. And resilience is probably one of the biggest assets to have in your toolbox, when making your way through life. 

Then just when you thought the week was over, it isn’t. We will reconvene on Saturday, at Weydon School, with over 100 delegates to hear our latest guest speaker, Dr Susie Nyman, talking about how to make learning fun and memorable. And as if that wasn’t exciting enough, our Sharon and Sam (that’s our ‘shop Sam’, as opposed to our ‘fundraising Sam’) will be raffling a brilliant Christmas hamper which is full of all sorts of Christmas goodies that have been kindly donated. So somebody will be going home with a smile on their face. 

It’s been a busy week. Let’s reconvene next week, and do it all again!

I look forward to updating you

Andy

10 November 2017

As I write this I’m half way through my fourth week at Helen Arkell and have learned lots more about the world of dyslexia and how this charity was set up back in 1971. 

It all started on Monday, as all the best weeks tend to do. On this particular Monday I found myself up in London (again). I was with Jilly, the chair of trustees at Helen Arkell who, like all charity trustees, is a volunteer. There were many other things she could have been doing, but instead Jilly took the day off work to kindly accompany me to somewhere near Green Park, where she introduced me to Brendan from the organisation CReSTeD (The Council for the Registration of Schools Teaching Dyslexic Pupils). 

Contrary to common belief, many charities work together, and as the new boy at Helen Arkell, it was important for me to meet Brendan who chairs the CReSTeD charity. They effectively accredit schools that make special provision for pupils with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties. In his day job, Brendan is Headmaster of Ellesmere School in Shropshire, which was the school that first led the way in this field. So I learned much from Brendan about the background of the dyslexia movement in the UK. We will be working together, not least because Helen Arkell houses CReSTeD’s only employee, who coordinates the Register from her office just down the corridor from mine. 

On Tuesday the learning curve continued, as I felt greatly honoured to meet with Peter Arkell, whose mum Helen set up the charity in 1970, along with fellow pioneers Elisabeth Waller and Joy Pollock. Peter is passionate about this charity, and not only because it bears the name of his mum, who still lives nearby. Peter reminisced about the history of the charity, and how his mum was determined not just to support people with specialist help but would also address bigger issues such as their confidence. As Helen herself said (and I quote from page 11 of Helen’s inspirational biography The Spellbinder):

“And when you think you’re stupid it not only affects your school life, your confidence gets a big knock. Since I’ve come to understand dyslexia I’ve felt much the most important thing is not the reading or spelling but the knock to the confidence.”

Throughout this week I have kept bumping into people in our team who are dedicated to building people’s confidence. That’s what Glynis does, particularly specialising with helping adults who are knocked because of their dyslexia. She has worked with several people today, either here at the Centre or through skype calls to people living elsewhere across the UK. All with the aim of helping them develop skills for life. And building confidence. Likewise Vicki, Sheila, Claire, Emma and Sara have all been working with children this week, again building confidence and helping people to understand what’s causing some of their difficulties. Above all, understanding that ‘you are not alone’.  

It’s a dedicated team and we all have the aim of making life better for people who come through our doors. If you would like to come and meet us, we are holding a Christmas Drinks evening on Wednesday 13 December. All welcome. Just register here. Meanwhile I hope you’ve booked your place for next weekend’s course for teachers of all age-groups and for parents too (18th Nov). I’m really looking forward to it! Just click here for more info.

If you’d like an inspirational read, I recommend you buy a copy of Helen’s biography, The Spellbinder, from our shop. (Only £3.99!). Again I quote:

“The Spellbinder is not only a success story, but one with thousands of happy endings for those who have learned from Helen to cope with their own dyslexia”.

And if you want to know why Helen was known as the Spellbinder, you’ll find out on page 18.

I look forward to updating you again next week

Andy

3 November 2017

So there I was, sitting on the train, minding my own business and wondering what we were going to eat for tea, when the lady opposite suddenly said “Excuse me, you’ve just sent me an email.”

‘Oh my goodness,’ I thought (or words to that effect), ‘what have I done?!’ My mind was racing, thinking of how on earth I could have mistakenly blue-toothed an email to a random stranger. I started sweating profusely at the thought of what trade secrets I might have mistakenly given away. And then all became clear.

It transpired that the lady is a friend of ours, and has signed up to receive our monthly newsletters. It just so happened that our October latest issue pinged through on her phone just at the moment that she was sitting on a train opposite a man with a name badge on, declaring himself to be Andy Cook from Helen Arkell. We had a great chat all the way to London, where I heard about her personal interest in dyslexia and by the time we arrived at Waterloo she was even considering doing some fundraising for us. As I sit writing this, I hear that she has completed our application form to run the London Marathon in aid of Helen Arkell. How brilliant is that?!

And in case you’re wondering how we would make use of donations like this, it’s all about enabling people to access our services who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford it. Just this week I have received letters from various people, explaining how their dyslexia is holding them back and becoming a big issue in their life. And how our help could make all the difference. This includes adults who are struggling in the workplace as well as children who are inexplicably underperforming at school, and feeling like failures as a result. If you think you could donate even just £10 to help us do this work, it would be amazing.

Another person who contacted me this week after receiving our newsletter is a writer, playwright and poet. She has had her plays performed on stage, and also leads poetry workshops. And she is dyslexic, describing herself as having overcome all sorts of hurdles to get where she is today. There are so many inspirational people with dyslexia – and the great thing is that they are getting in touch with us here at Helen Arkell to see how we can work together to help more people. Between us we can make a difference!

From all the above, you may get the gist that I am absolutely blown away by this charity! What you may not be aware of is that this is only my third week in post, so I have a lot to learn. To that end, as part of my induction, this week I attended our own training course for parents of dyslexic children, run by Gilly who knows exactly what she’s talking about because she has three dyslexic children of her own, and is a qualified tutor. I sat with 50 other parents who have dyslexic children (my stepson is dyslexic and an ‘old boy’ of Helen Arkell), learning more about the condition and practical ways to help. It’s a great opportunity to get people together who share similar experiences, and becomes a sort of ‘support group’ for people as well as teaching them about dyslexia.

The other great thing was that, when chatting to other parents on the course, it was clear that many people would like to join in the overall Helen Arkell team effort, either by volunteering their time, or acting as advocates for us out in their local communities. That’s absolutely brilliant and a great help. 

And in case you’re wondering why I was on the train (which you probably weren’t), I was heading to London to attend a meeting of the Council for Disabled Children, of which we are members, working alongside other charities such as Barnardo’s or the National Children’s Bureau. There’s a lot that we can do together.

And so my life at Helen Arkell continues. Next week will be week 4. And before you know it, I won’t be the new boy any more.

I look forward to updating you on how next week goes!

Andy

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27 October 2017

I’ve just completed my second week in the Helen Arkell team and it’s been quite a learning curve!

As the new kid on the block it was quite daunting to find myself sitting around a table with the combined brains of the country who are leading the way in the field of dyslexia. This was on Wednesday, during my second week at the charity. To my left was Bernadette McLean, former Principal of Helen Arkell, who has contributed so much to the dyslexia movement in the UK in general, and to the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre in particular. Sitting on Bernadette’s other side was Sir Jim Rose, author of ‘The Rose Report’ which is one of the most influential publications on dyslexia that has ever been produced. 

As I was introduced to each other member of this committee by turn, it became clear that each is an expert. It was a real honour for me to sit at the same table and ensure that Helen Arkell has a voice at this level, which can potentially influence government thinking.  

Of course while I myself may be new to the world of dyslexia, I am fortunate enough to head up a team that is crammed full of experts at many different levels. Not only experts in dyslexia, but also experts at treating people as individuals and helping them to find their own strategies in life, which will help them play to their strengths. My induction has so far included meetings with three educational psychologists, Gavin, Anna and Chris, who are part of our team, and who are called in to work with some individuals, whereas our team of specialist assessors, tutors and adult coaches may be called in to work with others. The golden rule is to bring in the most appropriate person to work with any given individual.

And in case you think that it must be scary to have an appointment with an educational psychologist or specialist assessor, I can assure you that when you see them making cups of ribena for the child with whom they are working (other fruit squashes are available!), or finding them a packet of biscuits, you really see the personal touch in action. Likewise every care is taken to put adults at their ease. Everybody’s aim here is to help people find a way forward in life that plays to their strengths, and being born with a degree of dyslexia should not be a barrier and can often be a positive advantage provided that you get the right help at the right time. (That’s a big proviso).

About 1 in 10 of us has been born with some degree of dyslexia (dyslexia frequently runs in families). This was brought home to me yesterday when I was in a room of 22 extremely senior and respected individuals, ranging from Crown Court Judges to chief executives, from Lieutenant Colonels to academic research scientists. At least three of these people informed me that they had personal experience of dyslexia and they would love to tell the world that dyslexia needn’t hold you back. Really really inspiring!

Meanwhile I’ve booked my place on Dr Susie Nyman’s course on the morning of Saturday 18th November, at Weydon School, Farnham. This is the course for you if you’d like to learn more about dyslexia in a very fun and entertaining way – whether you’re a teacher of any age group, or a parent, or just wanting to hear more about this fascinating subject. 

Not only that but it’s a bargain at £25, and I would really love to meet you there!! Come and join in the fun by registering here:

Book Dr Susie Nyman on 18 November at Weydon School

I look forward to updating you on whatever next week has in store for me as my induction continues!

Andy

20 October 2017

Wow! What a week this has been! My first week in the team at Helen Arkell and my mind is buzzing!

It all started with the really important things in life, like how to work the dishwasher and where to find the replacement loo rolls. By the end of the day I was so at home I was even trusted with learning the locking-up routine, which felt pretty grown-up. Imagine my excitement when our Julie informed me that I was now officially inducted into the out of hours emergency contact rota, which means that if the alarm goes off at 2am it will be me who sorts it out in my pyjamas?!

I then took part in one of Yvonne’s lessons, in which she is teaching the OCR Level 5 syllabus where teachers and learning assistants gain an in depth understanding of dyslexia. This was a brilliant insight into the nitty-gritty of what we do, and I was bowled over by the feedback from the students who are attending the course, saying what a special place we have here at Helen Arkell, and the ‘personal touch’ that we provide is so appreciated.

The other good thing about working here is that there’s always lego to play with! We keep it in reception for the children and you wouldn’t believe the amazing structures that they build. I am sure we have many budding architects coming through our doors! Our dedicated team of specialist dyslexia assessors and educational psychologists are continually working with a steady flow of children, whose parents are seeking some advice and guidance regarding their children’s progress at school.

And it’s not all about children either. Many adults come here too, seeking help. This week we received a lovely heartfelt note from one such person, thanking us for the sensitive and kind way in which their case had been handled by Hedda in this instance.

Then the excitement went up another notch, as I was allowed out to represent the charity at a meeting with a friendly contact in Farnham. (To be fair, I was accompanied on this occasion by Sam, who is a responsible adult and has worked at the charity for many years and therefore knows what she’s talking about). The meeting went well and could result in some nice donations to our cause. Fingers crossed!

At Helen Arkell we are determined to help more people with dyslexia to get the best out of life, and we can only do it with your help. Please help us to do this life-changing work by making a donation, large or small. You really would make my day! Just click below:

Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

Thank you so much!

I look forward to updating you on life behind the scenes at Helen Arkell as the weeks go by.

Andy

 

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