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SEND pupils not adequately supported

Pupil in classroom writing

This ATL (Association of Teachers and Lecturers) Poll shows pupils are falling through the net http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-37047055 further release from ATL below:

http://www.atl.org.uk/media-office/2016/send-pupils-not-adequately-supported.asp

Their report notes:

The government said it wanted all children to reach their potential.

However, of the 585 staff in English state schools who responded to the poll:

  • 70.7% believed the system was failing to identify all children with special needs quickly enough
     
  • 58.4% believed pupils officially identified as having special needs did not receive the help they need to achieve their potential
     
  • Almost half (48.6%) said they had been unable to access the support and training they needed to meet their pupils' needs

The union says new criteria mean that while pupils with complex or severe needs are eligible for high needs funding support, those with less complex needs such as dyslexia or dyspraxia do not automatically receive support.

As many as 200,000 previously identified as having special needs were not transferred into the new system, says the union.

There is limited training on the identification and support of pupils with SEND in initial teacher training and continuing professional in the workplace is limited.

  • Only 9% of respondents agreed that the current system in England enables all children with special educational needs to be supported appropriately
     
  • There is a lot of inconsistent practice in supporting and identifying learners with SEND at SEN Support level
     
  • There is a significant cohort of learners who appear to have SEND but are not recognised as such by the system – these learners are being let down

It is timely that the Department for Education has invested £750,000 to fund a teacher training project this autumn. Helen Arkell, along with other leading dyslexia and specific learning difficulties' charities will be delivering free teacher training 'Teaching for Neurodiversity: Engaging learners with SEND.'

In June 2016, the BBC reported the following:

'Schools in England are struggling to support the 1.1 million pupils with special needs or disabilities (SEND) in mainstream classrooms, a report says.

A survey of 1,100 school leaders found delays to assessments, insufficient budgets and cuts to local authorities were hampering the ability to cope.

The study by The Key, which provides leadership and management support to schools, calls for increased funding.

The government says it has increased funding for those with "high needs".'

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